comedy

NewsJack — writing comedy quickly

POSTED IN misc, my projects, writing | TAGS : , , , , 9 March 2012

I like to think I’m an amusing writer, and that I can think quickly. Doing a radio show for a couple of years I think demonstrated that, and I’ve tried my hand at stand-up comedy. But until recently, apart from the odd Twitter witticism  I’d not really tried writing topical comedy. BBC Radio Four Extra’s NewsJack is one of the few radio shows that has an open submissions policy, meaning that anyone can send in jokes and sketches and maybe get on and then get paid for them. I’ve had a few near misses that made it to the recording but not the edit, as they’re topical they’re disposable really so I wouldn’t share them. But this one from this week has a little bit of longevity so I thought I’d pop it up here. Hope it makes you chuckle.

NewsJack the Jung Ones

Funny, ha ha.

POSTED IN portfolio, writing | TAGS : , , 3 December 2010

The ability to make people laugh has always been something that is fairly central to my personality. I’m not entirely sure why, but it wasn’t for cliched make-the-bullies-laugh at school reasons, because I did—and they still hit me. 

That was a lot more to do with me being obviously poorer and shyer in a school full of the confident entitled. And a bit of a dick, I’ve always been a bit of a dick.

I’m wary of being seen to be taking anything overly seriously, or being unable to break the tension with a quip. Confrontation so rarely solves anything, so if you can dodge it all the better and that has something to do with it but there’s a streak of performance and the need for validation in there too.

Writing gentle satire, or being amusing around strict parameters is easy—there are hundreds of people doing it fairly competently around the country every day. Creativity is different though, if you have to come up with the ideas rather than react to situations, if you decide that adaption of existing jokes to the situation isn’t what you want to do, if you want to be funny without it relying on reference, then it’s somewhat harder.

I’ve done plenty of compering, quizes, awards, that sort of thing, where a tiny bit of wit will do wonders to prop up the ‘turns’. I’ve also injected the odd bit of humour into the various other bits of public speaking I do as part of ‘work’, that’s easy and really does help get the point across. 

What I’ve not done is stand-up comedy. 

Well, not until last week. When I, er did.

Stand-up is the purest form of entertainment, it’s just one person talking, and that’s exciting. It’s also quite scary, and difficult. I’ve always thought that I’d like to and would be able to, but have never got round to doing anything.

Part of the reticence has been because no-one is pushing me to do it, I’ve got plenty of creative outlets and it’s just another one. Putting myself forward to do even an open slot somewhere seems boastful somehow, I’d need proof that I could do it. Partly it’s that I want to be great at whatever I try, and as an art form it doesn’t offer many safety features: no-one can really tell how comedy is going to go down, and a silence at a stand-up gig leaves no hiding place.

All of which is why that, despite being bad at learning (or being taught, rather), I signed up for a course in stand-up a couple of months ago. I’d seen James Cook, the tutor, perform: being accomplished, funny, and obviously in control of an audience. There was stuff I could learn there, and I also had a vague feeling that the pressure to produce material might help my other writing.

I can write, I think, it doesn’t usually take me that long to produce something when I sit down to do it—but the time it takes me to actually start is sometimes a problem. I can only work well when inspiration strikes, or when a deadline is looming, and usually manage it by not attempting to work when I don’t feel right. I’m not going to do it, I figure, so I can get on with other stuff until the time comes. It’s a solution, but not a good one, and I thought perhaps that working on stuff across a couple of months could really help.

The other people on the course, run from a windowless but expensively carpeted conference room at mac, were a mixture of those that were thinking of doing it professionally eventually and those that just thought it might be fun. All were obviously comedy fans, which I guess you’d have to be. 

Alongside exercises, bits of stuff about things like mic technique, there were a couple of great sessions from comedians Andy White and Gary Delaney where they talked about how they worked and how they got started. The main thread of the sessions, though, was practical: listening to others trying out material and, when I could pluck up the courage, doing a bit myself.

I actually found this much more difficult than the more theoretical stuff. I didn’t want to say anything that would nudge people away from their own paths, I was worried about a homogenising effect with 14-15 would-be stand-ups working on routines in the same environment. It didn’t happen, without too much thought about style people seemed to find their own ways.

By the end-of-term showcase, in front of about 80 people, everyone on the course had enough stuff. Some had way too much and squeezed it into their allotted five minutes. It was an incredibly supportive audience, and each comic went down well.

I did struggle with material, I was after something that was sort of simultaneously clever and accessible and I couldn’t find anything I was happy with. In the end I’m not sure if I didn’t chicken out and go for easy laughs. I’m not sure I respect me as a stand-up, I think I can do it but I’m not sure if I can do it as well as I’d want to. I think I’ll wait for the big idea before having another go.

That’s not the fault of the course, which was really great and runs again in January. You’ll enjoy it if you have a go, I promise.

Stand Up

POSTED IN art, my projects | TAGS : , 18 November 2010

Next Friday (26th November) I’m doing a brief set as part of this Stand up Comedy thing.

I’ve not written the act, as such, yet—but it’ll probably be something to do with beards.

Sweary News

POSTED IN my projects | TAGS : , , , , , 4 July 2009

I and she do a radio show, The Big Paws, on the award winning Rhubarb Radio. This isn’t a plea to listen to that (although please do), but to give a little focus on a bit of the show that you may not have heard.

Sweary News Podcast

Sweary News Podcast

The Sweary News is the news, but sweary. It’s funnier than you may think, a 1-2 minute radio news bulletin with Wes Mundell (as played by Adam) the pottiest-mouthed newsreader around.

Me and Adam had the idea some years ago, and the original idea was a daily show on youTube each evening. That might never happen, but radio seems to suit the concept well. Ad writes and records the section just in time for me to get my magic beeper out. Here’s just two of the comments from this week:

“thank god for sweary news i have stopped gettin the sunday times cause all my news requirments are covered for the week”  Matt

“Yay! Sweary news. Almost worth getting up early for. ” Andy

It’s available as a podcast too (iTunes link). Bonus for the podcast is that a selection of the swears are unbleeped…

Hitler’s tache

POSTED IN misc | TAGS : , , 7 May 2009

Richard Herring has decided to live for a week with a Hitler moustache and see how people react. All in the name of comedy of course.

Moustache now trimmed and waxed. Do I get approval from brist... on Twitpic

Good causes, but didn’t it used to be funny?

POSTED IN found stuff | TAGS : , , 18 March 2009

It’s a box-ticking, event-telly-by-numbers mentality, and it made for the most tedious and unsatisfying Comic Relief Night since…the last one. These jamborees are not getting any better as they get older. They’re not getting any better as you get older either. The silliness of their – and your – early years is long gone. Likewise the easy ideals and the casual pursuit of cash.

Comic Relief Night : Off The Telly

Danny Smith on when comedy is “just a bit shit”

POSTED IN found stuff | TAGS : , , 16 March 2009

“Wehn is a German fella that’s looks like a cross between a scrotal sack and a sock puppet made by an abusive uncle, and his entire act rests on his nationality, and our own racist perceptions of it. Now some of you are thinking “Wow, his act must be a post-modern critique of nationalist perceptions, he must be subverting racial stereotypes by cleverly pointing out the flaws”, well… no he’s just a bit shit.”
Who’s Laughing Now? » Blog Archive » Review: Jongleurs 19th Feb

Radio Free Horse Shit For The Garden

POSTED IN birminghamuk | TAGS : , , , , , 9 February 2009

Young @probablydrunk on teh  @rhubarbradio on TwitPic

If you like the Two Ronnies your first thought when using the word Rhubarb is probably “manure”, but no more. At least until they run out of themes and end up doing a gardening-with-poo based show, Danny Smith et al’s Rhubarb Radio show puts all effluent fertilizer thoughts out of my head. It replaced them this week with robot sex, but that’ll change as long as I keep tuning in at 7pm on Saturdays.

If you spent your evening less productively this week you can still listen again:

Listen to Technical Difficulties on Rhubarb Radio

URL-based twitter social-stand-up

POSTED IN twitter | TAGS : , , 11 April 2008

I had a little idea earlier this evening, just a little URL-based one liner – so I twittered it. Some of my followers/followees joined in (and thanks to : catnip bluemilkshake editorialgirl graphiquillan kevin_rapley LloydDavis podnosh probablydrunk ) here’s the result. Quick lazyweb request, can someone build a twitter conversation reorderer that presents nice – I had to do this in photoshop:
twitter_url_standup

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